Fire safe cigarette – wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Fire safe cigarettes, abbreviated “FSC”, also known as lower ignition propensity (LIP), reduced fire risk (RFR), self extinguishing, fire safe or reduced ignition propensity (RIP) cigarettes, are cigarettes that are designed to extinguish more quickly than standard cigarettes if ignored, with the intention of preventing accidental fires. In the United States, “FSC” above the barcode signifies that the cigarettes sold are fire standards compliant (FSC).

Fire safe cigarettes are produced by adding two bands of fire retardant to the cigarette paper during manufacture in order to slow the burn rate at the bands. Because this process simply decreases the burn rate and does not prevent unattended cigarettes from igniting nearby materials or tinder, the term “fire safe” has been called a misnomer which could lead to a false sense of security. citation needed

The bands may be made from many materials, including cellulose, other polymers or materials such as thicker bands of paper citation needed . Many patents have been registered for potential materials, including EVA polymer (ethylene vinyl acetate). When burned, the polymer of EVA becomes unstable, and the health risks of inhalation are not known. EVA and PVA (polyvinyl acetate) polymer adhesives have been used by the tobacco industry for many years, and are the industry standards. citation needed A similar quantity of PVA polymer is required to glue the paper seam in a fire safe cigarette as in a standard cigarette. citation needed

EVA polymer must not be conflated with the EVA monomer, citation needed which is a reactive species with some toxic properties.

Cigarette filter – wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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