Smoking in indonesia — wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Kretek is credited as an invention by Nitisemito of Kudus, an industrial town in Central Java. It emerged in the late 19th century in Java. The practice was to roll, by hand, a compound of tobacco, cloves and cocoa in a dry corn husk wrap, which gives a honeyed flavour. It was Nitisemito who introduced cigarette papers in place of corn husk. Following this simple innovation, a Kretek manufacturing factory was set up in Sumatra. The first brand of cigarette produced in this factory, «Bal Tiga» (three balls), became very popular, and as result the economy of Kudus prospered and the inventor became a wealthy man. The inventor popularized his brand of cigarettes through a concerted media campaign, even establishing his own radio station for the purpose. He touted his habit of smoking kretek as the cure for his asthma. However, intense competition (25 manufactures are now reported in the city and its suburbs) and his ham handed management resulted in his becoming a pauper at the end, when he died in 1953. 9 Another local brand, which became very popular in the 1980s, is the Gudang Garam brand of Kretek. Chinese businessmen who are credited with establishing this brand of Kretek from a modest beginning in the 1920s produced 40 billion cigarettes in the 1980s. Other business enterprises competing with this brand tried to discredit the brand by attributing use of cannabis in addition to cloves and tobacco. It has the distinction of being the largest single employer in Indonesia. 10

Kretek is very popular in rural areas as this type of cigarette is cheap. It burns for a long period. However, when they are kept away they douse automatically. 11 They, however, do not cause any oral lacerations. Now, cigarette smoking has largely replaced betel chewing. 12

Kretek is defined as onomatopoeic . Its literal meaning is to crackle, which is the sound that is produced when it is burnt and inhaled. 9

Kretek cigarettes have harmful effects as it contains high concentration of tar and nicotine, almost four times that of ordinary cigarettes. Some countries have banned marketing this brand of cigarettes. The other harmful effect mentioned is from the clove oil used in making Kretek. The clove oil or eugenol is harmful to the lungs. The Indonesian Health Department reported in 2000 that 200,000 people get affected by cancer every year but its exact relation to smoking is not evaluated. This brand of cigarette is so popular that 5% of the national revenue is from this source, next only to the revenue from oil. Indonesia also records the highest growth of cigarette industry in the world, accounting for 4% of the world consumption. 9

While cigarette smoking is declining throughout the world, in Indonesia the industry is thriving. Manufacturers of Marlborough brand of cigarettes established a Kretek brand manufacturing factory in Indonesia in 2008. For over 50 years, Djarum has been another big brand international manufacturer of Kretek here. It has a research and development unit to improve on the quality of their cigarettes. Malaysia and USA are said to be two of their important markets. 8

Kretek was initially a habit of the lower classes of society. However, it has now become very popular among the «middle class and intelligentsia, to the extent that it has become very de rigueur and a mark of Indonesian ness.» 10

Kretek cigarettes are mostly slimmer than normal King Size cigarettes giving them a more modern and contemporary look and feel.

Harmful effects and regulations edit

Tobacco smoking in Indonesia is said to claim 300,000 lives every year. 13 Even though the country has required «no smoking» signs in health care units, educational institutions and in public transportation system, there is no ban on smoking in government and private offices, restaurants and bars. Tax exemptions in the country provide an incentive to the manufacturers to advertise the sale of cigarettes as compared to other countries in the region, in spite of the World Bank suggesting higher tax rates. As a result, tobacco manufacturers almost run cigarette advertisements for free. The advertisements, although warning of the ill effects of smoking, do not show any pictures, nor are the warning texts printed at strategic places on the cigarette packets. All these factors, plus its low cost, have contributed to the extensive proliferation of cigarette smoking in the country among people of all ages. 2 So much so, that even a two year old child picked up the habit of smoking two packs of cigarettes a day in his fishing village, where every one smokes. It was reported that the child’s father initiated his son into this habit at the age of 18 months. However, press reports indicate that the child has been placed in rehabilitation by keeping him in a different environment under the care of a psychologist, and as a result the child has given up smoking. 14 The government of Indonesia is now contemplating introducing regulations that would ban the advertising of cigarettes, smoking in public places and selling cigarettes to children. 5

References edit

Philip morris’ marlboro man is being replaced by blu cigs new tough guy

It s one of branding s eternal truisms that when you find an idea that works, you stick with it. It s why fatherly CEO Dave Thomas appeared in over 800 TV spots for Wendy s, why Aflac has stuck with the duck since 1999 and why Go Daddy has held tight to Danica Patrick s bumper for 11 Super Bowl spots now. There s a corollary to this rule, too. Once one brand discards a great idea, there s nothing stopping a similar brand from taking it up. Case in point the Marlboro Man and what looks like his kid brother in the ads here. But be it a tobacco smoke from the 50s or one of the many electronic alternatives on the market now, cigarette brands love associating themselves with the All American bruiser.

«Cigarettes were always about being a rebel,» observes Gwenaelle Gob , creative director of marketing think tank Emotional Branding and a filmmaker who recently explored gender representations on American billboards in her film This Space Available. «The imagery connects because it s an ideal,» Gob said. «Who doesn t want to be some version of the tough guy? This is what everybody demands men to be.»

This rugged but successful marriage between tough guys and cigs goes back to 1954 when Philip Morris introduced Marlboro as its first brand to feature a filter. Fearful that the foam tip would make the brand seem soft and feminine, the company hired legendary adman Leo Burnett, who understood that making Marlboro a real man s smoke meant showing real men. While most people recall the Marlboro Man as a cowboy, he was actually a variety of characters for the first few years mechanics, hunters and, like our hairy chested friend here, a coach (ex Navy at that, judging from the tattoo on his right hand). The hitch worked. By 1972, Marlboro was the best selling cigarette brand on the planet.

Of course, all the muscles in the world weren t enough to fight off the attorneys general in most every state in America. The $206 billion Master Settlement of 1999 sent the Marlboro Man riding off into the sunset. But good ideas are tough to kill as this 2013 ad for Blu e cigarettes demonstrates. «My intuition is that Blu purposely went to the Marlboro Man to give this ad the same look,» Gob said. Even if the brand didn t do that literally, the similarities are striking. Chances are you wouldn t pick a fight with either of these dudes.

It s anyone s guess if the tough guy image will work as well for Blu as it did for Marlboro. Blu is a battery driven vapor generator that comes in flavors including Cherry Crush and Vivid Vanilla facts that are a little tough to reconcile with the Brando esque aura of our denim clad stag here. Still, there s no denying the logic of the presentation. «If you walked up to anyone who s lived long enough, they can immediately conjure the Marlboro Man s image and describe it to you,» Gob said. «That icon is endless.»